Trinidad and Tobago, a dual-island nation in the Southern Caribbean, is located just north of Venezuela. The heart of Trinidad and Tobago is its Creole traditions, Calypso music, and Caribbean cuisine. The capital of Trinidad, Port of Spain, is famous around the world for its lively carnival season, which starts just after Christmas and lasts through the end of February.

The smaller island of Tobago is more well-known for its nature reserves and beautiful beaches. But both islands have stunning stretches of sand that are postcard-worthy. Some beaches are perfect for a short day trip from Port of Spain, and others are more popular for hiking, wildlife, and quiet time during a weekend getaway.

Any day of the week, you may find beachgoers taking a ride on a jet ski, snorkeling from one of the many glass-bottom boats, swimming, kite surfing, scuba diving, or enjoying “Trini” doubles and curry crab, both local favorites, at a local beach lime. Whether you are looking for an adventurous or a more laid back beach vacation, Trinidad and Tobago beaches have it all.

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

This beach has calm and shallow water, with channel markers to protect swimmers.

FACILITIES

Lifeguard hut, toilets, craft shops, beach chair rentals

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Beach sport, DJ/live music tent, swimming, craft shopping

RENOWNED FOR

White sand, sea life spotting, boats, restaurants

las cuevas bay trinidad

Considered one of Tobago’s most beautiful beaches, Pigeon Point Heritage Park is like a picture-perfect postcard. With long stretches of white sand and clear turquoise waters, it is an excellent spot for swimming, relaxing, or photography. The beach facilities include restrooms, showers, beach chair rentals, and restaurants for dining beachside. This beach overlooks the beautiful Buccoo Reef, which is home to an abundance of marine species.

maracas beach trinidad photos

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

This is a sheltered beach with calm waters and small waves. Waves can be large at times.

FACILITIES

Toilets, fish market

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, cliff jumping

RENOWNED FOR

Bird watching, fishing, surfing, scenery

Located on the northeast coast, Tobago’s Parlatuvier Bay, known for its breathtaking views and clear blue-green waters, is a hot spot for birdwatching and swimming. Snorkelers and scuba divers will also be delighted with the sea life in this Bay. The water gets quite deep, making it perfect for jumping from the cliffs, but use caution as there are no lifeguards on duty. For the photography lover, be sure to bring a camera to capture the stunning views in this bay.

port of spain beach

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

Secluded beach with calm deep water for swimming and snorkeling

FACILITIES

Lifeguard hut, toilets, bar, restaurant, craft shops, umbrella, and chair rental

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Snorkeling, scuba diving, bird watching

RENOWNED FOR

Sealife spotting, scenery, restaurants

port of spain beaches

Englishman’s Bay in Tobago has been voted as one of the best beaches in the Caribbean. The powdery sand stretches for a half-mile along the leeward coast of the island, and the lush vegetation keeps it hidden from the main road, making it feel somewhat remote. This bay is excellent for snorkeling, scuba diving, or relaxing in the sand. This beach also has a restaurant, bar, restrooms, and craft shopping on site. Englishman’s Bay is not one of Tobago’s most visited beaches, but it is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful.

trinidad tobago beaches

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

This protected beach has calm water for swimming and snorkeling

FACILITIES

Lifeguard hut, toilets, umbrella rental, fish market

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Kayaking, swimming, snorkeling, craft shopping, jet skis

RENOWNED FOR

Scenery, snorkeling, watersports

Located on the southeast side of Tobago, Mt. Irvine Bay is just a short walk from the public beach at Mount Irvine Beach Hotel. With full beach facilities and watersports rentals, visitors can enjoy jet skis, snorkeling, sailing a Hobie cat, or kayaking, making it a popular spot for the younger crowd. Nearby Buccoo reef, which is just offshore, is loaded with different types of sponges, coral, and marine fish species.

trinidad beach

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

This protected Bay has calm, warm water for swimming and anchoring

FACILITIES

No facilities

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Swimming, relaxing, photography, snorkeling

RENOWNED FOR

Scenery, 140+ step entrance from road, swimming

trinidad and tobago beaches

Pirate’s Bay is a hidden beach near the northeastern tip of Tobago. After traveling down a dirt road for half a mile and walking down the 140+ steps to enter the bay, beachgoers can take in the unspoiled beauty of the pink sand and calm waters. There are no facilities on this beach, but the swimming and snorkeling are excellent. Pirate’s Bay is also a popular spot for sailors to anchor overnight.

best beaches in trinidad and tobago

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

A calm bay suitable for swimming, with small waves

FACILITIES

Toilets, craft stalls, stores

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Swimming, seine fishing, craft shopping, nearby Castara waterfall

RENOWNED FOR

Old-fashioned dirt oven baking, seine fishing, unspoiled scenery

Located on the Leeward side of Tobago, Castara beach is a friendly place for local fishermen and tourists alike. The calm waters are suitable for swimming, and the soft sand makes for a pleasant walk along the beach. Beachgoers can also taste bread made in old-fashioned traditional dirt ovens or take a short trip to the Castara waterfall nearby. Located next to a small fishing village, visitors can also watch the fishermen bringing in their (seine) nets.

trinidad beaches

BLUE FLAG

Yes (until 2017)

SURF

A calmer bay, suitable for swimming, with light to moderate waves

FACILITIES

Toilets, restaurant nearby, lifeguard hut

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Swimming, picnics, live music, sunbathing

RENOWNED FOR

Scenery, swimming, blue flag beach

tobago beaches pictures

Located on the North Coast of Trinidad, Las Cuevas is the only Blue Flag beach (until 2017) in the southern English-speaking Caribbean. Las Cuevas is the second most popular beach in the northern part of the island and is a good spot for an afternoon picnic on the beach. A restaurant is also located near the car park, and there are toilets and changing facilities. The waves are calmer in this area, making it an excellent spot for swimmers and sunbathers. If you are not up for sunbathing, shaded caves line the beach.

maracas bay trinidad and tobago

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

Larger waves, around 3 feet (1 meter) on average. Swimming is possible but exercise caution

FACILITIES

Lifeguard hut, toilets, umbrella rental

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Surfing, body surfing, DJ/live music tent, picnics, swimming

RENOWNED FOR

Surfing, bodyboarding, local shark and bake

tobago beaches pictures

The most popular Port of Spain Trinidad beach, Maracas Bay, is located on the North Coast Road. Music and an island breeze fill the air of this 1.25 mile stretch of sandy beach. The waves are some of the best Trinidad surfing spots for local or visiting surfers and bodysurfing enthusiasts. Maracas Beach Trinidad is a hot spot for the local street food called “shark and bake,” or beachgoers can bring their own cooler for a Sunday picnic.

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

Small waves and calm waters suitable for swimming and snorkeling

FACILITIES

Lifeguard hut, toilets

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Snorkeling, scuba diving, swimming, sunbathing, hiking trails

RENOWNED FOR

Sealife spotting, scenery, scuba diving

maracas bay trinidad

Once used as an American submarine station during World War II, Macqueripe Beach Trinidad, located in Chaguaramas, is a popular sunbathing and swimming spot for locals. The beach is small, so there is little room to put down a towel, but the views of the cliffs above make up for it. On a clear day, you can even see Venezuela in the distance. After a nice swim, visitors can also visit the hiking trails in the mountains around the Bay. Or take a ride on the recently added ziplines overhead.

BLUE FLAG

No

SURF

Moderate waves not ideal for swimming except at the eastern end where the river meets the sea

FACILITIES

No facilities

POPULAR ACTIVITIES

Hiking, camping, waterfall swimming, turtle watching, photography

RENOWNED FOR

Ocean kayaking, sea turtle nesting, hiking, nearby waterfalls

tobago beach

A popular spot for camping and turtle watching in Trinidad, Paria Bay can only be reached by hiking or by boat. The sea can be choppy, making it ideal for ocean kayaking, but not swimming. For hikers needing to cool off after a nearly 2-hour hike to Paria Bay, the water is calmer on the eastern side of the beach where the river runs into the sea or in a nearby waterfall. Natural arches formed by erosion from the strong surf can be seen at the western end of Paria Bay. Turtle Rock, a small rocky peninsula named after its shape similar to the head of a sea turtle, can also be seen during the hike to the beach.

maracus beach in trinidad

RAINFALL

Trinidad and Tobago have a tropical climate making it hot year-round with little variation in seasons. There is a rainy season in Trinidad and Tobago during the months of June to December. The dry season runs from January to mid-April.

The most rainfall is usually recorded between May to December. But the highest average rainfall comes in June, July, and August during the hot summer months. The driest months are February, March, and April.

Average yearly rainfall in the capital, Port of Spain, is around 67 inches (17,000 mm). These rainfall averages are among the highest in not only the Caribbean but in the world. In Scarborough on the island of Tobago, the yearly average rainfall is 60 inches (1,500mm).

TEMPERATURE

The sea temperature in Trinidad and Tobago is warm throughout the year, making it a great place to swim or sunbathe. Between the months of February and March, the average water temperature is 79°F (26°C) and up to 84°F (29°C) in September.

The tropical climate in Trinidad and Tobago produces warm temperatures year-round, but the northeast tradewinds also blow year-round, providing a gentle breeze to cool things down. January and February are the coldest months of the year with average maximum temperatures ranging between 88 to 90 °F (31 to 32 °C) and average minimum temperatures of 68 °F (20 °C).

September and October are considered the warmest months in Trinidad and Tobago. The average maximum temperature is 90 °F (32 °C), and the average minimum temperature of 73 °F (23 °C).

BEST BEACH MONTHS

Trinidad and Tobago’s warm tropical climate is perfect for beachgoers anytime during the year. If you want to avoid the rainy season, you will want to travel during the months of January through April when it is the dry season. The air and sea temperatures are warm enough to enjoy beach activities no matter the time of year, and the northeast tradewinds provide a gentle breeze year-round.

The most popular months for tourists who come to enjoy the beaches on both islands are February, March, and April when they flock to paradise to avoid the cold weather in their home countries. In February, the beaches are a hot spot for carnival revelers cooling down after a long day, or night, of partying to the sounds of Soca and Calypso music.

Because of the islands’ southerly location, Trinidad and Tobago are primarily out of the path of hurricanes during the Atlantic Hurricane Season. Scuba divers frequent the island even during the rainy summer and hurricane seasons because of the flat sea conditions and excellent marine life.

The beaches of Trinidad and Tobago are not only a hot spot for tourists, but locals also enjoy the beautiful beaches on the islands they call home. Tobago is an ideal weekend getaway or vacation destination for Trinidadians because it is just a short plane ride or ferry from Port of Spain. The calm turquoise seas of Tobago are a perfect place to spend free time for any beach lover.

trinidad beaches map

TIME ZONE: Atlantic Standard Time (GMT-4)

CURRENCY: Trinidad and Tobago Dollar (TTD) 1 = .15 USD

CALLING CODE: +868

ELECTRIC VOLT: 115 V

PLUG TYPE: A and B

MAIN AIRPORT: Piarco International Airport (POS) and A.N.R. Robinson International Airport (TAB)

1. What is the best beach in Trinidad and Tobago?

The best beaches in Trinidad and Tobago may depend on the types of activities you like to enjoy at the beach. The highest-rated beach in Trinidad is Maracas Bay, which is famous for surfing, watersports, and the local street food “shark and bake.” The top-rated beach in Tobago is Pigeon Point Heritage Park – a picturesque beach, perfect for swimming, relaxing, or having a nice lunch by the Caribbean Sea. With the Caribbean hailing as a premier cruise destination and Scarborough Cruise Port so nearby, Pidgeon Point is incredibly popular amongst cruise travelers. If you are looking for a more secluded beach with an added hiking or camping adventure, Pirate’s Bay or Paria Bay may be the best beaches for you. Snorkeling in Trinidad is not quite as popular as snorkeling in Tobago, but it is possible at some beaches. Trinidad beaches can have higher surf than Tobago beaches.

2. What is the water temperature of the beaches in Trinidad and Tobago?

The water temperature in Trinidad and Tobago is quite warm. The warm sea temperatures attract swimmers and sea bathers to the beaches year-round. During the cooler months of January and February, the water temperature is 79°F (26°C) and reaches 84°F (29°C) in September which is the hottest month in Trinidad and Tobago. Because the water is warm year-round, the beaches of Trinidad and Tobago are popular hangouts for locals and tourists for sunbathing, swimming, snorkeling, boat tours, scuba diving, and surfing.

3. Which side of Barbados has the best beaches?

The west coast of Barbados is known as the “Platinum Coast” due to the warm turquoise waters of the Caribbean Sea. The west coast of Barbados has long stretches of white sand beaches and calm waters perfect for water activities. From the west coast of Barbados, Tobago is just 156 miles southwest. Sailors make the trip between the two islands and often see pods of dolphins or even whales during the crossing from island to island. From Barbados, visitors can take a short flight to Trinidad then hop over to Tobago in less than a couple of hours. Trinidad and Tobago are also a popular choice for Barbadians when choosing a vacation destination due to its close proximity by air or sea.

4. Is Trinidad and Tobago safe?

In Trinidad, there is a high level of violent gang-related crime. This mostly occurs in the inner city neighborhoods of Port of Spain, so these areas should be avoided, especially at night or in the early morning. These crimes rarely involve visitors and more focused on the local community. There is a higher risk for crime during the carnival season. In Tobago, violent crime incidents are infrequent, but there have been a few instances of robbery in recent years. When traveling to Trinidad and Tobago, maintain the same awareness and security of your belongings as you would in your home country. Do not carry large amounts of cash, wear flashy jewelry, or store valuables in your vehicle.

trinidad y tobago beaches

While you are in the area, be sure to check out these stunning Guatemalan beaches too! If you are ocean fanatics like Bill and myself, and you want to really get involved in the Caribbean waters, then have a look through our expert guide on snorkeling in the Caribbean. We also have some great destination-specific snorkeling guides for Cozumel, Aruba, and Belize.

As always, we create our content with you – our fellow adventurers – in mind. So, how’d we do? Was this informative? Which beaches did we leave out? Any golden nugget tips you’d like to share with everybody else in our happy ocean-loving community? We’d love to hear from you below. Thanks for reading and we hope your next adventure is a great one. Keep living Blue, Shaka & Cheers!

Heather Wyatt

Heather is a product expert, a degreed communications and business professional, and an adventurous, entrepreneurial travel writing enthusiast originally from Raleigh, North Carolina. Heather is a PADI-certified Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT) and holds a Silver Advanced Open Water Instructor certification from SSI, having logged more than 300 training classes over the last four years. Heather is a certified Travel Specialist and also holds a Day Captain's license qualifying her to skipper a boat up to 72 feet. She has extensive experience in specialty dive training, navigation, and booking travel accommodations. Her interests include writing, social media marketing, and serving her Virtual Assistant and Travel Clients from around the globe.

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